Use of activated carbon obtained from waste vine shoots in nickel adsorption in simulated stomach medium


Caliskan C. E., Ciftci H., Ciftci T., Kariptas E., ARSLANOĞLU H., Erdem M.

BIOMASS CONVERSION AND BIOREFINERY, vol.13, no.3, pp.2391-2400, 2023 (SCI-Expanded) identifier

  • Publication Type: Article / Article
  • Volume: 13 Issue: 3
  • Publication Date: 2023
  • Doi Number: 10.1007/s13399-021-01954-4
  • Journal Name: BIOMASS CONVERSION AND BIOREFINERY
  • Journal Indexes: Science Citation Index Expanded (SCI-EXPANDED), Scopus, Compendex, INSPEC
  • Page Numbers: pp.2391-2400
  • Keywords: Waste vine shoots, Activated carbon, Simulated stomach, Nickel, Adsorption
  • Çanakkale Onsekiz Mart University Affiliated: Yes

Abstract

In this study, it is aimed to remove nickel from the simulated body fluid by adsorption technique in order to reduce its harmful effects on the human body. Activated carbon was used for the adsorption of Ni(II) pollutants that may occur in the simulated stomach medium. Activated carbon gave a very porous structure with different sizes of pores by presenting a morphology suitable for the adsorption process. The results show the efficiency of activated carbon with interesting surface area values (1689 m(2) g(-1)) and total pore volume (0.842 cm(3) g(-1)). The most suitable adsorption parameters for nickel ions in the stomach environment simulated in a batch system (pH, time, mixing speed, amount of adsorbent, and the effect of other ions, etc.) were investigated. The initial nickel ion concentration was 10 mg L-1 and the adsorbent amount was 0.3 g, and it was determined that the maximum retention efficiency of nickel ions in the pH range 3.5-5.5 was 92%. The activated carbon material was also highly effective, with a maximum of 91.8% removal at 10 mg L-1 of Ni(II) solutions. Finally, the prepared material has basic properties that make it an effective adsorbent in purifying the pollutants that occur in the simulated stomach medium and we recommend that it can be used to clean the stomach environment in nickel poisoning in emergency interventions.