Color Change of the Snapper (Pagrus auratus) and Gurnard (Chelidonichthys kumu) Skin and Eyes during Storage: Effect of Light Polarization and Contact with Ice


Balaban M. O. , Stewart K., Fletcher G. C. , Alcicek Z.

JOURNAL OF FOOD SCIENCE, cilt.79, 2014 (SCI İndekslerine Giren Dergi) identifier identifier identifier

  • Cilt numarası: 79 Konu: 12
  • Basım Tarihi: 2014
  • Doi Numarası: 10.1111/1750-3841.12693
  • Dergi Adı: JOURNAL OF FOOD SCIENCE

Özet

Ten gurnard and 10 snapper were stored on ice. One side always contacted the ice; the other side was always exposed to air. At different intervals for up to 12 d, the fish were placed in a light box, and the images of both sides were taken using polarized and nonpolarized illumination. Image analysis resulted in average L*, a*, and b* values of skin, and average L* values of the eyes. The skin L* value of gurnard changed significantly over time while that of snapper was substantially constant. The a* and b* values of both fish decreased over time. The L* values of eyes were significantly lower for polarized images, and significantly lower for the side of fish exposed to air only. This may be a concern in quality evaluation methods such as QIM. The difference of colors between the polarized and nonpolarized images was calculated to quantify the reflection off the surface of fish. For accurate measurement of surface color and eye color, use of polarized light is recommended.

Ten gurnard and 10 snapper were stored on ice. One side always contacted the ice; the other side was always exposed to air. At different intervals for up to 12 d, the fish were placed in a light box, and the images of both sides were taken using polarized and nonpolarized illumination. Image analysis resulted in average L*, a*, and b* values of skin, and average L* values of the eyes. The skin L* value of gurnard changed significantly over time while that of snapper was substantially constant. The a* and b* values of both fish decreased over time. The L* values of eyes were significantly lower for polarized images, and significantly lower for the side of fish exposed to air only. This may be a concern in quality evaluation methods such as QIM. The difference of colors between the polarized and nonpolarized images was calculated to quantify the reflection off the surface of fish. For accurate measurement of surface color and eye color, use of polarized light is recommended.

Practical Application

If the eye of fish contacts water, it changes color and transparency as expected: the eye gets cloudier and color becomes lighter. However, if the eye does not contact water, this change is very slow and much less, having implications for freshness scoring by visual observation of the eye. Also, color of fish should be measured under polarized light, otherwise shine will interfere with the true color.