Evaluating Femicide Rates Through Hofstede Cultural Dimensions


Bekaroğlu C.

Management and Political Sciences Review, vol.3, no.1, pp.15-32, 2021 (National Refreed University Journal)

  • Publication Type: Article / Article
  • Volume: 3 Issue: 1
  • Publication Date: 2021
  • Title of Journal : Management and Political Sciences Review
  • Page Numbers: pp.15-32

Abstract

This paper aims to analyse the relationship between Hofstede Cultural Dimensions and cross sectional femicide rates, which have recently received increasing coverage in the media and lead to fundamental changes in laws all across the world. In our study, which includes a subset of femicide rates acquired from world health organization, we use regular Ordinary Least Squares (OLS) analyses, covering 47 countries, we find that femicide rates have no correlation with masculinity, but interestingly have a positive correlation with “Power Distance” and “Collectivism”, and to a certain degree, “Uncertainty Avoidance”, systematically explaining at least 37% of femicides across the world. The lack of any correlation with masculinity rules out a systematic gender-based violence against females though a significant amount of non-systematic male violence against females certainly does exist. We theorize that societies with a strong social hierarchical order, particularly supported by collectivistic behaviour, tend to be harsher and less tolerant of uncertainty and aberrant behaviour, punishing and sometimes killing their members although cultural structure alone cannot be the definitive cause of femicides, which most likely stems from rapid and inorganic institutional changes.

This paper aims to analyse the relationship between Hofstede Cultural Dimensions and cross sectional femicide rates, which have recently received increasing coverage in the media and lead to fundamental changes in laws all across the world. In our study, which includes a subset of femicide rates acquired from world health organization, we use regular Ordinary Least Squares (OLS) analyses, covering 47 countries, we find that femicide rates have no correlation with masculinity, but interestingly have a positive correlation with “Power Distance” and “Collectivism”, and to a certain degree, “Uncertainty Avoidance”, systematically explaining at least 37% of femicides across the world. The lack of any correlation with masculinity rules out a systematic gender-based violence against females though a significant amount of non-systematic male violence against females certainly does exist. We theorize that societies with a strong social hierarchical order, particularly supported by collectivistic behaviour, tend to be harsher and less tolerant of uncertainty and aberrant behaviour, punishing and sometimes killing their members although cultural structure alone cannot be the definitive cause of femicides, which most likely stems from rapid and inorganic institutional changes.