Epidemiology and associated factors for nosocomial methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus infection in a tertiary-care hospital


Sacar S. , Kutlu S. S. , Turgut H., Cevahir N., Cenger D. H. , Tekin K.

EPIDEMIOLOGY AND INFECTION, vol.138, no.5, pp.697-701, 2010 (Journal Indexed in SCI) identifier identifier identifier

  • Publication Type: Article / Article
  • Volume: 138 Issue: 5
  • Publication Date: 2010
  • Doi Number: 10.1017/s0950268809991063
  • Title of Journal : EPIDEMIOLOGY AND INFECTION
  • Page Numbers: pp.697-701

Abstract

We analysed nosocomial MRSA cases between January 2004 and December 2006 in a retrospective case-control study in a 250-bed tertiary-care teaching hospital. During the study period, 265 nosocomial Staphylococcus aureus infections were identified in 231 patients. There was a significant increase in methicillin resistance in isolates (MRSA) from these infections with frequencies for 2004 of 39/88 (44.3%), 2005 (62/80, 77.5%), and 2006 (75/97, 77.3%) (P<0.001). Multivariate analysis showed that associated factors for nosocomial MRSA infection were prolonged hospitalization (OR 3.982, 95% CI 2.235-7.094, P<0.001), mechanical ventilation (OR 3.052, 95% CI 1.666-5.590, P<0.001), surgical operation (OR 2.032, 95% CI 1.102-3.748, P=0.023), and male sex (OR 2.000, 95% CI 1.081-3.699, P=0.027). The determination of associated factors for methicillin resistance in nosocomial S. aureus infections in hospitals will play an important role in efforts to reduce MRSA infection rates.
We analysed nosocomial M RSA cases between January 2004 and December 2006 in a retrospective case-control study in a 250-bed tertiary-care teaching hospital. During the study period, 265 nosocomial Staphylococcus aureus infections were identified in 231 patients. There was a significant increase in methicillin resistance in isolates (M RSA) from these infections with frequencies for 2004 of 39/88 (44.3%), 2005 (62/80, 77.5%), and 2006 (75/97, 77.3%) (P < 0.001). Multivariate analysis showed that associated factors for nosocomial M RSA infection were prolonged hospitalization (OR 3.982, 95% CI 2.235-7.094, P < 0.001), mechanical ventilation (OR 3.052, 95% CI 1.666-5.590, P < 0001), surgical operation (OR 2.032, 95% CI 1.102-3.748, P = 0.023), and male sex (OR 2.000, 95% CI 1.081-3.699, P = 0.027). The determination of associated factors for methicillin resistance in nosocomial S. aureus infections in hospitals will play an important role in efforts to reduce M RSA infection rates.