Removal of Azure A Dye from Aqueous Environment Using Different Pretreated Fish Bones: Equilibrium, Kinetic, and Diffusion Study


Kizilkaya B.

JOURNAL OF DISPERSION SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY, vol.33, no.10, pp.1429-1436, 2012 (Journal Indexed in SCI) identifier identifier

  • Publication Type: Article / Article
  • Volume: 33 Issue: 10
  • Publication Date: 2012
  • Doi Number: 10.1080/01932691.2011.620896
  • Title of Journal : JOURNAL OF DISPERSION SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY
  • Page Numbers: pp.1429-1436

Abstract

In this study, the removal of azure A dye from aqueous environment was investigated using different pretreated fish bones for the best removal efficiency. The removal efficiency of the adsorbent was investigated as a function of contact time, initial dye concentration, and pretreatment process. Five different pretreatment processes were carried out on the fish bones to obtain the best removal procedure for the removal studies. The highest removal capacity was found to be 9.28 mg/g. The experimental data generally exhibit a good compliance with the pseudo second-order equation for all pretreated bones. Langmuir and Freundlich models were also applied to experimental equilibrium data to find the best adsorption isotherm. Weber-Morris and Urano-Tachikawa models were used to calculate diffusion constants. The results showed that pretreated fish bones can be effectively used as a sorbent for the removal of cationic dyes from aqueous environments.
In this study, the removal of azure A dye from aqueous environment was investigated using different pretreated fish bones for the best removal efficiency. The removal efficiency of the adsorbent was investigated as a function of contact time, initial dye concentration, and pretreatment process. Five different pretreatment processes were carried out on the fish bones to obtain the best removal procedure for the removal studies. The highest removal capacity was found to be 9.28 mg/g. The experimental data generally exhibit a good compliance with the pseudo second-order equation for all pretreated bones. Langmuir and Freundlich models were also applied to experimental equilibrium data to find the best adsorption isotherm. Weber-Morris and Urano-Tachikawa models were used to calculate diffusion constants. The results showed that pretreated fish bones can be effectively used as a sorbent for the removal of cationic dyes from aqueous environments.