Are the urology operating room personnel aware about the ionizing radiation?


Tok A., Akbas A. , Aytan N., Aliskan T., Cicekbilek I., Kaba M., ...Daha Fazla

INTERNATIONAL BRAZ J UROL, cilt.41, ss.982-989, 2015 (SCI İndekslerine Giren Dergi) identifier identifier identifier

Özet

Purpose: We assessed and evaluated attitudes and knowledge regarding ionizing radiation of urology surgery room staff.

PURPOSE:

We assessed and evaluated attitudes and knowledge regarding ionizing radiation of urology surgery room staff.

MATERIALS AND METHODS:

A questionnaire was sent by e-mail to urology surgery room personnel in Turkey, between June and August 2013. The questionnaire included demographic questions and questions regarding radiation exposure and protection.

RESULTS:

In total, 127 questionnaires were answered. Of them, 62 (48.8%) were nurses, 51 (40.2%) were other personnel, and 14 (11%) were radiological technicians. In total, 113 (89%) participants had some knowledge of radiation, but only 56 (44.1%) had received specific education or training regarding the harmful effects of radiation. In total, 92 (72.4%) participants indicated that they used a lead apron and a thyroid shield. In the subgroup that had received education about the harmful effects of radiation, the use ratio for all protective procedures was 21.4% (n=12); this ratio was only 2.8% (n=2) for those with no specific training; the difference was statistically significant (p=0.004). Regarding dosimeters, the use rates were 100% for radiology technicians, 46.8% for nurses, and 31.4% for other hospital personnel; these differences were statistically significant (p<0.001). No significant relationship between working period in the surgery room, number of daily fluoroscopy procedures, education, task, and use of radiation protection measures was found.

CONCLUSIONS:

It is clear that operating room-allied health personnel exposed to radiation do not have sufficient knowledge of ionizingradiation and they do not take sufficient protective measures.