Human exposure to trace elements via farmed and cage aggregated wild Axillary seabream (Pagellus acarne) in a copper alloy cage site in the Northern Aegean Sea


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YİĞİT M., DWYER R., Celikkol B., YILMAZ S., BULUT M., BÜYÜKATEŞ Y., ...More

JOURNAL OF TRACE ELEMENTS IN MEDICINE AND BIOLOGY, vol.50, pp.356-361, 2018 (Peer-Reviewed Journal) identifier identifier identifier

  • Publication Type: Article / Article
  • Volume: 50
  • Publication Date: 2018
  • Doi Number: 10.1016/j.jtemb.2018.07.020
  • Journal Name: JOURNAL OF TRACE ELEMENTS IN MEDICINE AND BIOLOGY
  • Journal Indexes: Science Citation Index Expanded, Scopus
  • Page Numbers: pp.356-361
  • Keywords: Trace elements, Copper mesh pens, Health risk assessment, Human exposure, Seabream, POTENTIAL RISK-ASSESSMENT, FISH FARM, NET-PENS, SALMON, AQUACULTURE, MESH, SEDIMENTS, METALS, VARIABILITY, IMPACTS

Abstract

Axillary seabream (Pagellus acarne) farmed in a copper alloy mesh pen and wild individuals of P. acarne aggregated near the copper-alloy cages presented higher concentrations of trace metals in the liver, skin and gills than in fish muscle tissues in two batches of small and large fish sizes. Elevated mean levels of metals (mg kg−1)
in muscle tissues in both small and large fish size groups were observed in the rank order of Zn(3.43)>Fe(3.01)>Cu(0.59)>Mn(0.13) and Fe(3.82)>Zn(3.32)>Cu(0.62)>Mn(0.17) for copper cage-farmed fish, relative to ranked mean levels for Zn(2.64)>Fe(1.95)>Cu(0.25)>Mn(0.09) and Fe(5.79)>Zn(3.58)>Cu
(0.58)>Mn(0.28) for the copper cage-aggregated wild fish. Nevertheless, trace metal concentrations in fish harvested from the copper cage or those of the cage-aggregated wild individuals in both size groups were far below maximum levels of seafood safety recommended by USEPA and FAO/WHO. Target hazard quotients, calculated to estimate the non-carcinogenic health risks of metals by consuming these fish, were below “1″ (THQ < 1), indicating that there were no potential health risks for humans when consuming copper-caged fish or wild-caught individuals aggregated around the copper mesh pen, with respect to the limits suggested by US Food and Drug Administration and EU Regulations for Seafood Consumption.

Axillary seabream (Pagellus acarne) farmed in a copper alloy mesh pen and wild individuals of P. acarne aggregated near the copper-alloy cages presented higher concentrations of trace metals in the liver, skin and gills than in fish muscle tissues in two batches of small and large fish sizes. Elevated mean levels of metals (mg kg−1)
in muscle tissues in both small and large fish size groups were observed in the rank order of Zn(3.43)>Fe(3.01)>Cu(0.59)>Mn(0.13) and Fe(3.82)>Zn(3.32)>Cu(0.62)>Mn(0.17) for copper cage-farmed fish, relative to ranked mean levels for Zn(2.64)>Fe(1.95)>Cu(0.25)>Mn(0.09) and Fe(5.79)>Zn(3.58)>Cu
(0.58)>Mn(0.28) for the copper cage-aggregated wild fish. Nevertheless, trace metal concentrations in fish harvested from the copper cage or those of the cage-aggregated wild individuals in both size groups were far below maximum levels of seafood safety recommended by USEPA and FAO/WHO. Target hazard quotients, calculated to estimate the non-carcinogenic health risks of metals by consuming these fish, were below “1″ (THQ < 1), indicating that there were no potential health risks for humans when consuming copper-caged fish or wild-caught individuals aggregated around the copper mesh pen, with respect to the limits suggested by US Food and Drug Administration and EU Regulations for Seafood Consumption.