The Effect of Gender on Sexual Behavior, Knowledge of Sexually Transmitted Diseases and Contraceptive Methods in College Students in Turkey


Tanriverdi G., ERSAY A. R.

TURKIYE KLINIKLERI TIP BILIMLERI DERGISI, vol.30, no.3, pp.1039-1045, 2010 (Peer-Reviewed Journal) identifier identifier

  • Publication Type: Article / Article
  • Volume: 30 Issue: 3
  • Publication Date: 2010
  • Doi Number: 10.5336/medsci.2008-9898
  • Journal Name: TURKIYE KLINIKLERI TIP BILIMLERI DERGISI
  • Journal Indexes: Science Citation Index Expanded, Scopus
  • Page Numbers: pp.1039-1045

Abstract

Objective: This study was conducted to examine the effect of gender on sexual behavior, sexually transmitted diseases (STDs) and contraceptive methods in college students in Turkey. Material and Methods: The research population was comprised of 396 students in a university school for Health College and Occupational School for health sciences. The sample was the 322 (81%) of the students who agreed to participate after being informed about the purpose of the study. The research data were analyzed using frequency distribution, chi-square analysis and independent sample t test. Results: According to the research results, the mean age for female students' first sexual intercourse was 18.85 +/- 2.16 and 16.76 +/- 2.31 years for males and females, respectively. It was determined that 24.0% of the male students and 13.7% of the female students had sexual intercourse; 59.5% of the male students and 19.6% of the female students reported that they masturbated. The same percentage of male and female students had insufficient information about sexually transmitted diseases. During sexual intercourse, 41.1% of female students' sexual partner and 58.3% of male students used a condom. Conclusion: As a result, in this study the male students had their first sexual intercourse earlier than the female students and had a higher percentage of having sexual intercourse (p< 0.05). However, any meaningful difference was not found between male and female students for the knowledge of STDs and the rates of using contraceptive methods (p> 0.05).