The effect of high-pressure food processing on the sorption behaviour of selected packaging materials


Caner C., HERNANDEZ R., PASCALL M., BALASUBRAMANIAM V., HARTE B.

PACKAGING TECHNOLOGY AND SCIENCE, vol.17, no.3, pp.139-153, 2004 (Peer-Reviewed Journal) identifier identifier

  • Publication Type: Article / Article
  • Volume: 17 Issue: 3
  • Publication Date: 2004
  • Doi Number: 10.1002/pts.650
  • Journal Name: PACKAGING TECHNOLOGY AND SCIENCE
  • Journal Indexes: Science Citation Index Expanded, Scopus
  • Page Numbers: pp.139-153
  • Keywords: high pressure processing, sorption, food/package interaction, limonene, polymeric film, food simulant, packaging materials, LOW-DENSITY POLYETHYLENE, FLAVOR COMPOUNDS, AROMA COMPOUNDS, FILMS, JUICE

Abstract

The sorption behaviour and flavour-scalping potential of selected packaging films in contact with food simulant liquids (FSLs) (ethanol and acetic acid solutions) were evaluated after high-pressure processing (HPP). The films used were monolayer polypropylene (PP), a multilayer (polyethylene/nylon/ethylene vinyl alcohol/polyethylene: PE/nylon/EVOH/PE), film and a metallized (polyethylene terephthalate/ethylene-vinyl acetate/linear low-density polyethylene: metallized PET/EVA/LLDPE) material. D-limonene was used as the sorbate and was added to each of the FSLs. After HPP treatment at 800 MPa, 10 min, 60degreesC, the amount of D-limonene sorbed by the packaging materials and the amount remaining in the FSL was measured. Untreated controls (1 atm, 60degreesC and 40degrees'C) were also prepared. Extraction of the D-limonene from the films was performed using a purge/trap method. D-limonene was quantified in both the films and the FSL, using gas chromatography (GC). The results showed that D-limonene concentration, in both the films and the food simulants, was not significantly affected by HPP, except for the metallized PET/EVA/LLDPE. Significant differences in D-limonene sorption were found in comparison with the control pouches. The results also showed that changes in temperature significantly affected the sorption behaviour of all films. Copyright (C) 2004 John Wiley Sons, Ltd.